The shooting from Mandalay Bay hotel windows in Las Vegas and other recent attacks like the Manchester Arena bombing on May 22 reveal the security vulnerabilities of live events. Many sports and concert venues continue to rely on traditional security measures like metal detectors. Recent incidents show the hospitality industry and live-events industry must do more to protect guests. The mass shooting that took place on October 1, 2017, in Las Vegas killed 58 people and wounded more than 515 others.

Hotels are considered soft targets

Airports and government buildings long ago adopted strict security measures to protect guests and workers. The hospitality industry is reluctant to increase screening measures for guests because doing so would change the guest experience. Screening guests as they enter hotel lobbies and incorporating checkpoints on guest room floors would add an aspect of unease and discomfort to the guests that are the polar opposite of what hotels strive to provide. However, that does not relieve hotels and live-event organizers from the responsibility to keep people safe. A personal injury lawyer can advise individuals of their rights and options if they are injured during a hotel stay.

Convenience comes with risks

Richard Hudak is a former FBI agent and currently a managing partner at Resort Security International. Hudak says the Mandalay Bay hotel utilized by the Las Vegas gunman had reasonably good security in place compared to most hotels. The Mandalay Bay used both uniformed and plainclothes security officers. Hudak says many conveniences like mobile check-in apps allow guest to totally bypass all human interaction as they enter a hotel and can even open guestroom doors with their smartphones. The Las Vegas shooter checked in days before the attack and never allowed housekeeping into the room. Some hotels incentivize foregoing housekeeping services.

More can be done

Live event planners and hotels must utilize technology for more than loss prevention and to enhance the guest experience. Concert organizers must have disaster plans in place and be prepared to rapidly evacuate all attendees should the need arise. During the Vegas strip shooting and Paris concert hall bombing, those in attendance were left to find their own way of escape. There was no direction for a mass evacuation. Hudak says one of the best security options is the effective training of all employees and coordination with local authorities for all live events.