With few exceptions, Nevada drivers must give the right-of-way to pedestrians. Should they fail to yield to pedestrians, motorists may hit them with their vehicles, which may result in serious injuries or death. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration reports that pedestrian accidents caused an average of one death every 88 minutes in 2017.

The Rules for Pedestrians

Wherever they exist, pedestrians must use sidewalks. Just as they expect for vehicles to travel on the road, drivers may anticipate pedestrians in areas designated for their use. In areas without sidewalks, pedestrians should walk facing traffic on the left side of the road, which may improve their visibility and reduce the chances of them getting struck by a vehicle.

Pedestrians have the right-of-way in crosswalks or intersections. However, this does not allow them to cross whenever or wherever they choose. Rather, pedestrians must use caution and due care. They must obey the indications on traffic signals, and refrain from jaywalking or crossing diagonally unless authorized to do so by the traffic-control devices.

The Rules for Drivers

At all times, drivers must use caution to avoid hitting pedestrians. To this end, they must yield to pedestrians in crosswalks and intersections. In situations when pedestrians unlawfully enter the road or cross outside of an intersection, drivers’ obligation to avoid pedestrian accidents supersedes their right to the traffic lane.

The Rights of Injured Pedestrians

Pedestrians injured as a result of struck-by collisions may seek to hold the at-fault drivers for their associated losses. The damages people may seek for pedestrian accident claims include compensation for their pain and suffering, medical bills, the costs of any future medical care, lost wages, and the loss of future income. Pedestrians may recover such damages from the at-fault drivers’ insurance companies, or they may have to pursue legal action in order to gain compensation.

The Role of Fault in Pedestrian Accidents

Even if pedestrians share some of the blame for their accidents, they may still recover compensation. For example, a driver may attempt to shift the fault by arguing that the pedestrian was intoxicated at the time of the crash. Under the state’s comparative negligence law, pedestrians may obtain damages provided they are not officially found more than 50% at fault for the collision. The court may, however, reduce their damage awards by their percentage of fault.